Windows 10 Delete Fingerprint Data

How to remove fingerprints from Windows 10

If you ever delete an account from Windows 10 BUT FORGET to FIRST delete all the fingerprint data belonging to that account, the fingerprint data stays forever in that specific device. The only way you can create another account and use your fingerprints to login again is to get new fingerprints. 8*)

But there is a fix! Following the threads all afternoon I eventually came across this thread on Microsoft’s support blog. https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/93a122ff-3455-4b29-b3e8-2b72d49d19e3/windows-81-delete-all-fingerprint-data?forum=w81previtpro

DELETE C:\Windows\System32\WinBioDatabase\[GUID].DAT file and then restart the computer.

I had to boot into a Linux partition to get enough “administrator rights” to delete the files, but once deleted I could once more use the fingerprint functionality.

 


How to configure Windows 10 to allow sign ons using credentials from Office 365

In my lab I have several computers which are used by many different community members, from job trainees in formal training at my agency to students and business persons just stopping by for a cup ‘o joe and to check their email. It is impractical to give every person their own account on every computer. However I wanted each student to be able to have their own file space and community members to work on their resumes and such without a need for special treatment.

Now, thanks to changes Microsoft provided in Windows 10, people can Readmore..




Conky in Linux Mint v18

locked-computer-cartoonConky changed between Linux Mint v17.1 and v18. While the transition requires mostly copy/paste new code to the top part of your .conkyrc file and leaving the bottom part as is, certain things no longer work.

For example, reporting the status of certain important background tasks, SSH & Apache2, stopped working because UpStart is no longer a part of Linux Mint v18 so “status ssh” no longer works: “Systemd” is now the thing. Don’t get me started on their choice to muddle the ethernet port names ‘to make them more predictable’. “Eth0” worked really well for me in my one-port only systems.

Back to the topic. Typing “service ssh status” will work as a normal user (you need no longer be root to use it), but the output takes up several lines, which I don’t want: I want a simple “Yes it is running” or “No it is not running”.

$ service ssh status
● ssh.service - OpenBSD Secure Shell server
 Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/ssh.service; disabled; vendor preset: enabled)
 Active: inactive (dead)

Sep 10 20:57:00 pops systemd[1]: Starting OpenBSD Secure Shell server...
Sep 10 20:57:00 pops sshd[28133]: Server listening on 999.999.999.999 port 98765.
Sep 10 20:57:00 pops systemd[1]: Started OpenBSD Secure Shell server.
Sep 10 20:58:13 pops systemd[1]: Stopping OpenBSD Secure Shell server...
Sep 10 20:58:13 pops systemd[1]: Stopped OpenBSD Secure Shell server.
$

Here is how I fixed it.conkyrc-screencut

${color FFAA00}Process Status ${hr 2}$color
 SSH: ${exec service ssh status | sed -n '/Active:/p' | cut -c 11-27}
 Apache: ${exec service apache2 status | sed -n '/Active:/p' | cut -c 11-27}