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Four boxes of liberty

Abraham Lincoln O-77 matte collodion print

(From WikiPedia.org)

The four boxes of liberty is an idea that proposes: “There are four boxes to be used in the defense of liberty: soapballotjury and ammo. Please use in that order.”

Concepts and phrases evolve and are applied in new ways.[1] The “four boxes” phrase always includes the ballot, jury and cartridge (or ammo) boxes. Additional boxes, when specified, have sometimes been the bandbox, soapbox, moving box, or lunch box.[2][3][4] The phrase in various forms has been used in arguments about tariff abolition, the rights of African Americans, women’s suffrage, environmentalism and gun control.[5][6][7][8]

The soap box represents exercising one’s right to freedom of speech to influence politics to defend liberty. The ballot box represents exercising one’s right to vote to elect a government which defends liberty. The jury box represents using jury nullification to refuse to convict someone being prosecuted for breaking an unjust law that decreases liberty. The cartridge box represents exercising one’s right to keep and bear arms to oppose, in armed conflict, a government that decreases liberty. The four boxes (in that order) represent increasingly forceful (and increasingly controversial) methods of political action.

Read more at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_boxes_of_liberty